Kate Hudson and Matthew Bellamy have announced the name of their little boy, born Saturday, July 9.

Welcome to the world Bingham Hawn Bellamy!

They’re calling him “Bing.”

I recall reading several references in the press about their difficulty agreeing on the name (something many of us can relate to, I’m sure).  It seems Bingham has satisfied both parents requirements, and I’m so curious what they were!  Any guesses?

Maybe Dad wanted an English name tied to his culture, and playful American Mom wanted something that wasn’t too stuffy?  Think alliteration was important to her?  After all, big brother is Ryder Russell Robinson.

Bing Bellamy is super fun name that doesn’t take itself too seriously.  I see him sporting a faux hawk and an arm full of gorgeous tattoos, or whatever the downtown thing in L.A. is in 2033.  Bingham Bellamy, on the other hand, could sit on the House of Lords– er, maybe the House of Commons.  They both work for an actor or a rock musician.

Love that they honored Goldie in the middle.

UPDATE: Bingham nicknamed Bing did tick all the boxes for both parents, but not just stylistically.  Bingham is Bellamy’s mother’s maiden name, and Kurt Russell’s father was called Bing.  So it seems fated.  I wonder why it was so hard to decide?

Mid-Century Modern

June 26th, 2009

the-cygnet

There’s something in the water.  

While I’ve had my eye on Bernard and Rosemary, other unlikely candidates such as Lois, CalvinJune and Theodore are popping up on baby name message boards with some frequency.  SJP chose Marion Loretta for one of her girls, and Appellation Mountain coincidentally featured Clyde, Marjorie, and Florence in the past three days.  Fellow blogger Onomastitrix calls her daughter Bonnie, among other things.  What do all these have in common, you ask?  

They were all top picks in the 1950s.  

Most will likely find these names tired.  Mother or even grandmother names, they’ve past their prime, hit middle age, and are for all intents and purposes, not ready for a comeback just yet.  However, they do have that coveted element of surprise.  They avert current conventions of “old-lady-chic” or newly coined cutesy names.  

The boys’ list represents a kind of geek chic.  The girls have rather a kitsch quality.

Below are some possibilities from the top 200 in 1950.  Their rank then and now are follow in parenthesis.  Maybe you can just honor your mother directly without altering it from Mary to Maren.

 

Girls

Anne (84, 499)

Barbara (4, 758)

Belinda (174, 747)

Betty (26, NR)

Beverly (31, NR)

Bonnie (33, NR)

Carmen (186, 262)

Claudia (126, 417)

Constance (85, NR)

Dolores (139, NR)

Diana (47, 137)

Dorothy (35, NR)

Edith (150, 806)

Eileen (91, 760)

Esther (162, 274)

Florence (190, NR)

Glenda (87, NR)

Gloria (31, 431)

Gwendolyn (113, 586)

Irene (92, 636)

Jacqueline (55, 152)

June (137, 863)

Lois (83, NR)

Loretta (120, NR)

Louise (109, NR)

Lucille (180, 615)

Marianne (192, NR)

Marion (198, NR)

Marjorie (121, NR)

Martha (32, 617)

Mary (2, 97)

Nancy (6, 379)

Paula (54, 681)

Priscilla (169, 416)

Regina (143, 688)

Roberta (96, NR)

Rosemary (101, 754)

Sally (78, NR)

Shirley (19, 911)

Susan (5, 712)

Vivian (138, 207)

Yolanda (179, NR)

 

Boys

Albert (55, 372)

Alfred (96, 787)

Arthur (46, 363)

Bernard (109, 940)

Bruce (26, 476)

Calvin (105, 228)

Clarence (95, 938)

Claude (177, NR)

Clyde (136, NR)

Frank (29, 278)

Frederick (75, 523)

George (20, 153)

Gilbert (144, 728)

Gordon (108, 946)

Gregory (25, 236)

Guy (179, NR)

Harold (45, 737)

Harvey (147, NR)

Howard (63, 903)

Jerome (103, 616)

Johnny (50, 246)

Kenneth (15, 136)

Kent (182, NR)

Lawrence (33, 427)

Leon (119, 502)

Lloyd (107, NR)

Louis (67, 351)

Paul (18, 155)

Philip (53, 378)

Ralph (52, 868)

Randolph (162, NR)

Raymond (31, 215)

Rex (196, 799)

Roger (27, 463)

Roy (51, 497)

Theodore (99, 297)

Timothy (32, 108)

Vernon (134, NR)

Wallace (198, NR)

Walter (40, 393)

 

Above: The Cygnet, a children’s replica of the 1958 Swan Chair by Arne Jacobsen